UNC Archive

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Duke’s McCrory heads All-ACC Academic Swimming & Diving Team

Duke senior Nick McCrory has been named the 2014 Atlantic Coast Conference Men’s Swimming & Diving Scholar-Athlete of the Year and headlines the 2014 All-ACC Academic Men’s Swimming & Diving Team, as announced today by Commissioner John Swofford.

A religion major from Chapel Hill

Nick McCrory.

Nick McCrory.

, McCrory won his fourth individual national championship in the platform dive discipline at the 2014 NCAA Championships, becoming the first to accomplish the feat in that event. In addition, McCrory earned All-America status on the one-meter board. McCrory completes his career as an 11-time All-American and a record 10 gold medals in ACC Championship competition.

Each of the ACC’s 11 schools that sponsor men’s swimming and diving are represented on the All-Academic Team, led by Virginia Tech with nine student-athletes. Virginia and Notre Dame have six apiece, while North Carolina has five, NC State has four and Georgia Tech has three. Duke and Florida State each had two, followed by Pitt, Miami and Boston College with one honoree.

Virginia Tech’s Ryan Hawkins and Nick Tremols, along with Florida State’s Tom Neubacher, NC State’s Jonathan Boffa and Virginia’s Taylor Grey, were named to the league’s academic team for the fourth time in their careers.

The ACC Scholar-Athlete of the Year awards were established in September 2007 to be awarded annually to the top junior or senior student-athlete in their respective sports. Candidates for the awards must have maintained a 3.0 grade point average for their career as well as a 3.0 for each of the last two semesters.

To be eligible for consideration for the All-ACC Academic Team, a student-athlete must have earned a 3.00 grade point average for the previous semester and maintained a 3.00 cumulative average during his academic career.

Sean Murphy
Sr.
Finance & Info Systems
Boston College

Nick McCrory #
Sr.
Religion
Duke

Hunter Knight
Sr.
Psychology
Duke

Tom Neubacher %
Sr.
Sport Management
Florida State

Jason McCormick
Fr.
Business
Florida State

Andrew Kosic #
Jr.
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
Georgia Tech

Nico van Duijn #
Jr.
Electrical Engineering
Georgia Tech

Mats Westergren
So.
Business Administration
Georgia Tech

Zach Nees
Sr.
Computer Science
Miami

Jack Nyquist
Fr.
Undecided
North Carolina

Patrick Myers #
Jr.
Business
North Carolina

Brad Dillon @
Sr.
Economics
North Carolina

Sam Lewis
So.
Mathematics
North Carolina

Dominick Glavich @
Jr.
Child Development & Family Studies
North Carolina

Jonathan Boffa %
Sr.
Graphic Design
NC State

Andreas Schiellerup
Fr.
Biological Sciences
NC State

Derek Hren
Fr.
Nutrition Sciences
NC State

Adam Linker
Fr.
Engineering
NC State

Joe Coumos
Fr.
Undeclared
Notre Dame

Colin Babcock
Sr.
Information Technology Management
Notre Dame

Zach Stephens
Jr.
Marketing
Notre Dame

Matthew Buerger
So.
Science-Business
Notre Dame

Kevin Hughes
Jr.
Accountancy
Notre Dame

Cameron Miller
Jr.
Science-Business
Notre Dame

Jon Lierley
Jr.
Finance
Pitt

Nathan Hart @
Sr.
Electrical Engineering
Virginia

Luke Papendick @
So.
Undeclared
Virginia

Yannick Kaeser
So.
Undeclared
Virginia

Jack Murfee @
Sr.
English
Virginia

David Ingraham
Jr.
Commerce
Virginia

Taylor Grey %
Sr.
Environmental Science
Virginia

Ryan Hawkins %
Sr.
Architecture
Virginia Tech

TJ Shinholser
Fr.
Business
Virginia Tech

Morgan Latimer @
Jr.
History
Virginia Tech

Harrison Cefalo
Jr.
Electrical Engineering
Virginia Tech

Brandon Fiala
Fr.
Finance
Virginia Tech

Robert Owen
Fr.
University Studies
Virginia Tech

Kyle Butts #
Jr.
Finance
Virginia Tech

Nick Tremols %
Sr.
Communications
Virginia Tech

CJ Fiala
Jr.
Communications
Virginia Tech

@ denotes two-time honoree

# denotes three-time honoree

% denotes four-time honoree

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UNC women go cold, fail to make it to Final Four

Allisha Gray.

Allisha Gray.

North Carolina, playing Stanford in Stanford, got out to a 13-point lead in the first half behind hot shooting but went cold in the second half to fall 74-65 in an Elite 8 game.

The Tar Heels, who end 27-10, went six minutes without a point during one stretch of the second half when Stanford came from six down at the half to take the lead. Then, over the last two minutes of the game, Stanford wrapped it up with an 8-0 run.

Carolina got down by eight in the second half but managed to go ahead 63-62 on a three from the top of the key by Jessica Washington with just under four minutes to play. But the Tar Heels would score just once more.

The Tar Heels made 7 of 13 first-half 3s but went just 2 of 9 in the second half.

UNC’s Allisha Gray scored 19 points while Diamond DeShields was held to 13 points on 5 for 15 from the floor including just one of six from beyond the arc.

Stanford, 33-3, goes to the Final Four to face unbeaten Connecticut. Two ACC teams – Notre Dame and Maryland – face off in the other semi-final.

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Tar Heel women make it to the Elite 8

tarheellogoNo. 12 upset No. 8 South Carolina 65-58 in the NCAA Sweet 16 on Sunday evening at Maples Pavilion.

North Carolina scored the first five points of the contest and looked to take control of the physical game. The Tar Heels made their move midway through the first half, going on a 9-2 run to build a 10-point lead at 20-10. The Gamecocks scored the next five points, making the score 20-15 with 6:42 on the clock, but did not find the basket for the next four minutes.

Latifah Coleman gave the Tar Heels their largest lead of the half at 27-15 with three minutes remaining, draining a 3 from straight away as the shot clock was expiring.

The Tar Heels led 29-21 at the half.

South Carolina scored on three straight possessions to draw the Gamecocks to within three at 35-32 with 14:45 to play. It was the closest since the Gamecocks had been since the 12-minute mark in the first half.

Diamond DeShields, who led the Heels with 19 points, asserted herself on the offensive end to put the Tar Heels back ahead 39-32. SC’s Tiffany Mitchell sank back-to-back 3s to help South Carolina draw to 43-42.

The Tar Heels seized the momentum back with back-to-back 3-pointers from Jessica Washington and DeShields putting the Tar Heels up 49-44 with 7:08 remaining.

The Gamecocks pulled to within two at 53-51 with five minutes left, but the Tar Heels had the answer, scoring six unanswered points to stretch the lead out to 59-51 with 2:40 on the clock ultimately settling for a seven-point victory.

The Tar Heels, 27-9, will play in Tuesday night’s regional final against Stanford (32-3), an 82-57 winner on its home court against Penn State in Sunday’s first game.

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DeShields leads Tar Heels into the Sweet Sixteen

Diamond DeShields.

Diamond DeShields.

Diamond DeShields almost singlehandedly put North Carolina into the Sweet 16 of NCAA Women’s Tournament by scoring 24 points and hauling in a season-high 12 rebounds to lead the Tar Heels over Michigan State 62-53 in Chapel Hill.

It was the first double-double for the freshman guard.

The Tar Heels, now 26-9, is the only Triangle team left in the tournament and will play in Sunday’s Stanford Regional semifinal.

In the first round, North Carolina had to rally from 18 down in the second half to beat UT Martin 60-58.

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Carolina certainly messed up late but a game shouldn’t end on a timing issue

clockThere were two or three plays late that hurt Carolina, that’s for sure. But a game shouldn’t end on a clock snafu.

The play that started Iowa State’s late run was Marcus Paige’s hurried three-point shot with about four minutes left. Carolina should have taken time off the clock and should have gotten a better look.

Paige took blame for the loss for a turnover he made in the last minute of the game but there is no guarantee Carolina would have scored on that play. But there was a guarantee that Carolina could have taken time off the clock with four minutes left and gotten a better shot. That was a bigger error.

UNC was up by eight and a bucket of any sort, three or not, could have been a big blow to Iowa State. Instead Iowa State quickly got the ball up the court and hit a three. What could have been an 11 or 10 point lead was instead five.

On Carolina’s very next possession the Heels turned it over on a foul. I’m not necessarily saying that McAdoo didn’t foul on the offensive end without the ball, but that’s a strange call for an official to make anyway, much less that late in a game.

The perfect storm continued on the next possession. After a Nate Britt miss, Kennedy Meeks had a chance for a relatively easy rebound stick back and he rushed it without fully controlling the ball and the tip missed.

North Carolina had every chance to win the game – well, make that almost every chance. After the final bucket, UNC players should have called a timeout. Of course the officials should have known Coach Williams was calling a timeout.

Yes, the clock should have started when Carolina inbounded the ball but once that ship has sailed it seems unfair to simply call the game over. If officials can look at the video to check the clock, it seems they could also look at the coach calling timeout.

A game should not end like that. A season should not end like that.

If you have the game on tape, go back to the 15.7 second mark after McAdoo tied the game at 83-all. The clock failed to start for about one or two seconds after an Iowa State player touched the inbounds pass. If you are going to call a game over when there is time left on the clock because there shouldn’t have been time left on the clock, it seems you would be a stickler with 15.7 seconds left also.

In fact, there were times throughout the game where the clock didn’t start accurately yet it’s only a problem at the end.

Could you imagine an NFL playoff game ending because the officials said the clock should have started and didn’t so one team doesn’t get to attempt a field goal even though there is time left?

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Tough season for UNC ends on tough shot, no last-second chance

uncbasketballclipartNorth Carolina fought adversity before the season, during the season and in the last game of season.

With a key player sidelined by injury and players in foul trouble, the Tar Heels came from behind to take an eight-point lead late, only to see Iowa State hit seven of its last eight shots to eliminate UNC from the NCAA Tournament 85-83. (3/23)

The last shot, by Iowa State’s DeAndre Kane, came with 1.6 seconds left to win it.

UNC’s James Michael McAdoo had hit two free throws with 15.7 seconds left to tie the score before Kane hit a driving, high-off-the-backboard shot that won it.

What made the loss even more devastating for Carolina was a clock snafu after the Kane shot and the fact that officials didn’t see UNC coach Roy Williams calling for a timeout. After several minutes of viewing the video, officials said that the game clock should have started and didn’t and proclaimed the game over.

UNC senior Leslie McDonald said that “it hit us hard” that the Heels didn’t get a chance to score after Iowa State’s late bucket but neither he nor Williams blamed the officials. “Kane just hit an unbelievable shot,” McDonald said.

McAdoo, who now must endure the speculation that he might go pro, agreed. “We played it really well. He just hit a tough shot,” McAdoo said.

Kane dominated much of the game, scoring a game-high 24 points. But it took a pair of threes by ISU’s Naz Long late to put Kane in the situation to win it.

“They made plays down the stretch that they needed to make,” Williams said.

North Carolina’s Bryce Johnson played only two minutes before twisting his ankle and having to sit out the rest of the game.

For more on the game, please click here.

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UNC beats No. 1 Maryland in big lacrosse matchup

unclacrosseSixth-ranked North Carolina’s efficient offense, combined with an outstanding defensive effort, led the Tar Heels to an 11-8 victory over top-ranked Maryland in men’s lacrosse action Saturday afternoon at Kenan Stadium before a crowd of 6,135.

This marked the second straight year UNC has knocked the Terps when they were the No. 1 team in the nation. A year ago, Carolina beat the Terps at Byrd Stadium 10-8 on March 23, 2013. It also marked the third successive year Carolina has beaten a #1 team (it also beat Johns Hopkins in 2012) after having not knocked one off since 1996.

North Carolina ran its offense well, scoring 11 times on 31 shots and committing only 10 turnovers. UNC also benefitted from a perfect 16 for 16 in the clearing game and the Tar Heels scored twice on three EMO chances.

Both teams exhibited balanced offensive attacks. Pat Foster and Joey Sankey each had two goals and two assists for UNC and Shane Simpson had two goals and a helper. Chad Tutton, Jimmy Bitter, Spencer Parks, Jake Bailey and Walker Chafee also scored for UNC. An extra-man goal by Chafee with 3:40 to play in the second quarter put Carolina ahead for good at 5-4. Maryland crept within one goal three times in the second half but could never get an equalizer.

Connor Cannizzaro led the Terps with two goals an assist while Colin Heacock scored twice for Maryland. Mike Chanenchuk had a goal and an assist for the Terps.

Maryland’s Charlie Raffa dominated the face-off circle for the Terps, winning 16 of 23 draws and that helped Maryland seize a 35-26 edge in ground balls. But UNC’s defense was a key factor in Maryland committing 16 turnovers, 10 of them forced, and the Terps hurt themselves with an 0-for-4 performance on the extra-man. The Terps had come into the game at 50 percent on the extra-man for the season but Carolina’s man-down unit play proved to be a key to the game.

Maryland fell to 7-1 overall with the loss and the Terps are 2-1 in the ACC heading into a home game against Virginia in eight days. Carolina improved to 7-2 overall and 1-2 in the ACC and will next be in action at Johns Hopkins next Saturday.

Maryland’s offense had scored in double figures in every game this season and came into the game averaging 13.14 goals per game. Carolina goalkeeper Kieran Burke continued his outstanding play of the last two weeks as he made 12 saves and had three ground balls. Niko Amato went the whole way for Maryland in the cage, making eight saves.

Joey Sankey, Austin Pifani and Mark McNeill each had two caused turnovers for UNC while Pat Foster and Zach Powers each had four ground balls. Both players had career highs for ground balls. McNeill added three ground balls to the UNC total. Raffa led the Terrapins with eight ground balls while Amato had six and defenseman Michael Ehrhardt five.

Carolina opened the scoring when Joey Sankey scored in transition off a Pat Foster assist a little less than two minutes into the game. Maryland answered quickly with goals by Heacock and Cannizzaro before Foster and Tutton struck for back-to-back unassisted tallies to put the Heels up 3-2 at the end of the first quarter.

Sankey’s goal ran his consecutive game streak with at least one point to 30 in a row and he has now scored goals in 27 of the past 30 matches. Tutton has scored at least one goal in 20 of the past 21 games and 33 of the past 35 contests.

Neither team found the back of the net in the opening half of the second quarter but Maryland put together back to back goals by Cannizzaro and Ehrhardt 12 seconds apart to seize a 4-3 lead with 7:12 left before intermission. That would be Maryland’s last lead of the game.

Carolina ran off the last three goals of the half. Shane Simpson evened the game off a Sankey feed at 6:14. At 3:52, Maryland’s Casey Ikeda was banished from the field for a minute for an illegal body check and UNC cashed in just 12 seconds later when Chafee scored his third extra-man goal in the last two games off an assist by Foster. UNC ran its lead to 6-4 at the half when Bitter’s initial shot was saved by Amato but the ball bounced right to Spencer Parks who dunked it from two yards away.

Maryland outscored the Tar Heels 3-2 in the third quarter but never got the game tied. A goal by Chanenchuk just 45 seconds into the half was matched by Carolina’s Foster less than two minutes later. Brian Cooper scored a fast break goal off an Amato assist at 9:18 but Simpson responded for UNC just 1:03 later. The final goal of the third quarter came at 3:20 as Cannizzaro fed Joe LoCascio.

Carolina stretched its lead to three at 10-7 with a pair of goals in the opening six minutes of the final stanza. Joey Sankey scored for the Heels in a timer-on situation off a feed by Simpson at 10:21 and then 50 seconds later Bitter dodged from the right side and beat Amato for a three-goal cushion. Bitter has now recorded a point in 35 straight games and scored goals in 30 of the past 32 outings.

Marylan’s Heacock found himself alone on the crease for a back-handed putaway at 8:41 to pull the Terps within two. Less than a minute later, Tim Rotanz turned the ball over and Jake Bailey scooped up and went coast to coast to score with 7:45 to play. It was his second career goal.

Down the stretch Burke made saves at 4:21 on a shot by Cannizzaro and at 1:52 on a shot by Henry West to keep the Terps at bay. Carolina’s offense then killed off all but 13 seconds of the final two minutes to close out the victory.

The Tar Heels have now beaten the Terps in five-straight regular-season meetings, a feat UNC has matched only one other time from 1990-94. Carolina also improved to 4-0 in games played at Kenan Stadium over the past two seasons.

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Tar Heels win NCAA thriller with – surprise, surprise – free throws at the end

James Michael McAdoo.

James Michael McAdoo.

North Carolina, which led by nine midway through the second half, trailed by seven late but outscored Providence 15-6 over the last four minutes to advance in the NCAA Tournament 79-77.

It took free throws by James Michael McAdoo, much maligned for his free throw shooting during the season, in the closing seconds to win it for the Tar Heels.

Trailing 71-64, UNC’s Brice Johnson got free for a dunk to pull the Heels within five. Carolina’s pressure defense stopped the Friars and Johnson hit a short jumper in the lane seconds later to make it 71-68.

Johnson followed up the offensive spurt with a blocked shot on the defensive end that led to a Marcus Paige three from the top of the key to tie it with just over three minutes left.

Twice Providence, behind Bryce Cotton (36 points on the night), got the lead back up to three. But Carolina came back both times. The first time JP Tokoto converted an old-fashioned three-point play when he hit a hanging in the air, across his body, off the backboard shot in the lane.

The second time Paige swished another three, this one shaded to the left of the key, to tie it at 77-all with 1:06 left.

Johnson came up with another good defensive play with 35 seconds left when he bothered a shot and came away with a rebound.

Carolina held for a last shot. Johnson got the ball down low and put up a shot with six seconds left. The shot was a wild one but McAdoo got the offensive rebound with 3.5 seconds left and was fouled.

It took officials three minutes to determine how much time was left on the clock. Then Providence coach Ed Cooley called a timeout to further ice McAdoo, who shoots only 54 percent from the line.

McAdoo’s high-arching shot swished through the net to give Carolina a 78-77 lead. The second free throw was long and McAdoo got his own rebound and was fouled with 1.7 seconds left. This time it only took officials two minutes to determine the time.

McAdoo again swished the first free throw but missed the second free throw. Providence’s Cotton got his hand on the rebound but it went out of bounds with less than a second left.

Carolina inbounded it to advance to the Round of 32 and move to 24-9 on the season.

While McAdoo hit only two of four free throws at the end, it was enough and ironically the two misses may have been positives in eating clock.

To read more on the game, please click here.

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Providence coach says his team deserved to beat “the almighty blue bloods”

Coach Ed Cooley.

Coach Ed Cooley.

Not sure Providence coach Ed Cooley meant to be condescending to North Carolina after the Tar Heels defeated his team 79-77. But he was.

Most coaches praise the other team after a loss. Cooley said, “Nobody even thought our guys would be here to play the almighty blue bloods… I thought we deserved to win. But you’ve got to get lucky at the right time and we didn’t.”

Hmmm. He’d be a good coach for one of Carolina’s chief rivals. Calling someone a “blue blood” isn’t considered a positive. Neither is calling the other team lucky.

Perhaps his team deserved to win but not any more than the Tar Heels deserved to win.

He did say it was a well-played game. Of course he made a point to say it was a well-officiated game as well. It was the first time that the Tar Heels have seen that crew. UNC coach Roy Williams and the Carolina faithful didn’t seem as impressed with the officials.

By the way Cooley, who has a skin condition that prevents hair from growing in certain spots on the back of his head, has lost more than 100 pounds.

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Coach Williams should stay out of health care politics

Ok, so President Obama scrimmaged with the Tar Heels a few years ago and he picked the Tar Heels to win the national championship in 2009 when the Heels defeated Michigan State. That doesn’t mean UNC coach Roy Williams should be jumping head first into a political boiling pot.

Williams has made a commercial trying to get young people to sign up for Obamacare. This is a powder keg issue and one that Williams is likely on the losing side.

First, the American people never demanded or even asked for government health care. Sure, health care costs are high but ObamaCare only increases the costs. I know, my health care is going up well over 100 percent – more than double what I was paying. Not everyone had health insurance before Obamacare and not everyone has it now.

Second, young people aren’t stupid. They know that they are less likely to need insurance to the extent they have to be covered under ObamaCare. They also know that the Obama administration needs them to pay for the insurance of older people, who are more likely to need health care. Young people would be paying for insurance they don’t need so that ObamaCare has a chance at working at all.

Third, this is politics pure and simple. If Roy Williams wants to endorse a candidate or a party, he should just go ahead and do it. But to lend his name and, in turn, that of the university to a scheme that doesn’t work, won’t work, isn’t good for the majority of citizens and isn’t favored by the American people is just silly.

Millions of Americans have had their health insurance canceled as a result of the so-called Affordable Care Act. Plus, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office reports that Obamacare will cause more than 2 million Americans to lose their jobs.

While the Supreme Court allowed Obamacare to stand by a 5-4 decision, since then there have been 37 significant changes to Obamacare, of which at least 20 were made unilaterally – and unconstitutionally according to Obama supporter and Georgetown law professor Jonathan Turley – by the Obama administration. Only 15 changes have been made legally by Congress.

And Roy Williams wants to get behind this? Yes, people should have health insurance but the government should not be in the business of demanding it and Roy Williams shouldn’t be in the business of promoting it.

By the way, I am not against covering preexisting conditions or even keeping children on policies longer but those things can be done without the debacle of Obamacare.

I’m not a Democrat or Republican but it’s clear that the Affordable Health Care Act is not affordable, not good for my health care and a power grab for big government. Even if you don’t feel that way, is this really something to which Williams should lend his name?

Former UNC coach Dean Smith used to speak out on political topics and he has been on both the right side of history – regarding civil rights – and the wrong side – regarding foreign policy. As much as people love and respect former Coach Smith, he delved into politics when he tried to get President Reagan to go along with nuclear disarmament. Instead, Reagan in part used the strength and threat of American weapon systems to bring down the Berlin Wall and the Soviet Union.

Everyone is entitled to their own opinion on controversial topics but why Roy Williams would want to get involved in this disaster is beyond me. More people are against Obamacare than even know about what happened with PJ Hairston or the Carolina academic scandal.

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williamsobamacare