UNC Archive

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UNC freshman wins ACC women’s tennis player of the year

Jamie Loeb.

Jamie Loeb.

North Carolina freshman Jamie Loeb has been selected the 2014 Atlantic Coast Conference Women’s Tennis Player of the Year and leads the 2014 All-ACC Team as announced by Commissioner John Swofford.

In addition to Loeb, the Tar Heels’ Haley Carter also took home one of the league’s top honors, as she was named Freshman of the Year. Clemson’s Nancy Harris was named the ACC Coach of the Year for the first time in her career.

Individual honors, as well as the All-ACC teams, were determined by a vote of the league’s 15 head coaches.

Loeb, a native of Ossining, N.Y., is just the third North Carolina student-athlete to earn Player of the Year honors, while Carter is the first Tar Heel to earn Freshman of the Year honors.

Harris, who led the Tigers to a share of the ACC regular season title for the first time since 2007, becomes the second Clemson head coach to earn Coach of the Year honors, joining Andy Johnston who won the award four times – most recently in 1993 – during his time with the Tigers.

Thirteen ACC institutions had representatives on the All-ACC team, led by Virginia with four representatives. North Carolina, Duke, Miami and Clemson had three representatives apiece. Florida State, Georgia Tech and Virginia Tech each posted two honorees on the teams, while Boston College, Maryland, NC State, Notre Dame and Syracuse rounded out the list with one representative apiece.

Duke’s Ester Goldfeld and Hanna Mar, along with NC State’s Joelle Kissell, were All-ACC selections for the third time in their career. A total of nine student-athletes collected All-ACC honors for the second time in their career.

Individual Award Winners

Player of the Year – Jamie Loeb, North Carolina
Freshman of the Year – Haley Carter, North Carolina
Coach of the Year – Nancy Harris, Clemson

All-ACC First Team
Jamie Loeb Fr. North Carolina
Julia Elbaba @ So. Virginia
Beatrice Capra @ So. Duke
Hayley Carter Fr. North Carolina
Stephanie Wagner @ So. Miami
Ester Goldfeld # Jr. Duke
Kendal Woodard @ So. Georgia Tech
Hanna Mar # Sr. Duke
Danielle Collins So. Virginia

All-ACC Second Team
Joelle Kissell # Sr. NC State
Caroline Price @ Jr. North Carolina
Kelsey Laurente So. Miami
Megan Kurey So. Georgia Tech
Kerrie Cartwright Jr. Florida State
Jessica Wacnik Jr. Boston College
Yana Koroleva @ Sr. Clemson
Maddie Kobelt Sr. Syracuse
Stephanie Nauta @ So. Virginia

@ – Two-time honoree
# – Three-time honoree

- News release

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ECU hangs on to drop UNC to 23-18 on the season

baseballlogouncZach Houchins had four hits and Ryan Williams worked the final 4.2 innings out of the bullpen as East Carolina hung on for a 3-2 win over visiting North Carolina Tuesday evening at Clark-LeClair Stadium. Landon Lassiter homered for the Tar Heels, who dropped to 23-18 on the year and will host No. 30 Liberty Wednesday at 6 in Chapel Hill.

For the sixth game in a row, Carolina fell behind early and had to try to come from behind. Tuesday it was a wild pitch from UNC starter Taylore Cherry (0-1) that scored the opening run in the third. After ECU’s Drew Reynolds led off the inning with a single, Houchins doubled him to third with nobody out. Cherry got the first out of the frame with a bare-handed grab of an Ian Townsend grounder, but send his first pitch to Luke Lowery to the backstop to score Reynolds. But the sophomore right-hander got Lowery and Bryce Harman on strikes to escape further damage.

Carolina almost equalized immediately as Korey Dunbar sent a deep fly to right to open the fourth against starter Reid Love, but Townsend leapt above the wall to rob the home run and keep it 1-0 Pirates.

The Tar Heels did tie it up in the fifth via the longball, as Lassiter drove his first home run of the year out to left with one out. After a Skye Bolt bunt single and a Dunbar walk, ECU called on Williams with two on and Carolina poised to take its first lead of the night. But Williams got Parks Jordan to ground to first and proceeded to retire the next 10 batters in order.

With Williams dominating on the mound, the Pirates scratched out an insurance run in the eighth thanks to some good fortune. Harman led off the frame against Trevor Kelley with an infield single and, after failing to get a bunt down, Charlie Yorgen reached when his ball off the end of the bat stayed fair for another infield hit. After a Garrett Brooks sacrifice, Hunter Allen’s bloop single to center scored pinch-runner Ben Fultz to make it 3-1. Carolina avoided further damage when Alex Raburn tracked down Bolt’s errant throw to third and retired Yorgen trying to score from second.

But the insurance run would prove vital when the Tar Heels finally got to Williams in the ninth. Zach Daly reached on a one-out error before Michael Russell extended his hitting streak to 13 games with a single back up the box. Wood Myers then drove in Daly with a hit to put the tying run in scoring position with just one out. But Williams got Joe Dudek to fly to center and then struck out Bolt to end it, giving the Pirates their first win over UNC in exactly five years.

Williams allowed just two hits and an unearned run over 4.1 innings for his 10th win of the season. Kelley put together another in a string of solid outings, going 3.0 innings with just three hits and a single run.

Carolina will return to Boshamer Stadium Wednesday to face No. 30 Liberty at 6 p.m. The Flames have been one of the best stories of 2014 and entered the week with a 31-9 record and an RPI of 20.

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Devils play two against Syracuse; Heels play two against Louisville next season

acclogo2Next season the Duke and North Carolina basketball teams will have premier home and home series. The Devils host and travel to Syracuse, Notre Dame, North Carolina and Wake Forest while the Tar Heels host and travel to Louisville, Georgia Tech, Duke and NC State.

“It’s exciting to look ahead to our league’s basketball schedule, as there’s no shortage of quality conference games,” said ACC Commissioner John Swofford. “This two-year alignment will allow for outstanding opportunities that will highlight our teams and players while providing our fans with continually appealing matchups.”

The matchups released today designate the 18-game home and away opponents for each of the next two seasons. Specific game dates, times and networks have not yet been determined.

Next season will mark the third in which each ACC team will play an 18-game conference schedule. With Louisville joining the ACC on July 1, nine of the conference’s 15 teams will enter next season having made postseason appearances in 2013-14, including seven teams that took part in NCAA Tournament play this past year.

The ACC’s collective non-losing streak in the NCAA Tournament reached 27 years in 2013-14, by far the longest stretch in the nation. The ACC has had at least one team ranked among the Top 10 of the final Associated Press poll for 54 consecutive years.

Conference game matchups for the next two seasons for Triangle teams are as follows:

Duke 2014-15
Home/Road: North Carolina, Wake Forest, Syracuse, Notre Dame
Home: Miami, Georgia Tech, Clemson, Pittsburgh, Boston College
Road: Florida State, NC State, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Louisville

North Carolina 2014-15

Home/Road: Duke, NC State, Georgia Tech, Louisville
Home: Florida State, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Syracuse, Notre Dame
Road: Miami, Clemson, Wake Forest , Pittsburgh, Boston College

NC State 2014-15
Home/Road: North Carolina, Wake Forest, Clemson, Virginia
Home: Duke, Virginia Tech, Pittsburgh, Syracuse, Notre Dame
Road: Florida State, Miami, Georgia Tech, Louisville, Boston College

Duke 2015-16
Home/Road: North Carolina , Wake Forest , NC State, Louisville
Home: Florida State, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Syracuse, Notre Dame
Road: Miami, Georgia Tech, Clemson, Pittsburgh, Boston College

North Carolina 2015-16
Home/Road: Duke, NC State, Boston College, Syracuse
Home: Miami, Georgia Tech, Clemson, Wake Forest, Pittsburgh
Road: Florida State, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Louisville, Notre Dame

NC State 2015-16
Home/Road: North Carolina, Wake Forest, Florida State, Duke
Home: Miami, Georgia Tech, Clemson, Louisville, Boston College
Road: Virginia, Virginia Tech, Pittsburgh, Syracuse, Notre Dame

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Duke opens defense of ACC golf title Friday

dukegolfThe team pairings are set for the opening round of the 61st annual ACC Men’s Golf Championship, which will be held Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, April 25-27, over the 7,102-yard, par-72 course at the Old North State Country Club in New London, N.C.

Boston College, Maryland and Notre Dame begin the championship on Friday teeing off at 8:30 a.m. NC State, North Carolina and Duke are in the next wave at 9:20, followed by Wake Forest, Clemson and Florida State at 10:20 a.m. Virginia Tech, Virginia and Georgia Tech have the morning’s final tee time at 11:10 a.m.

ACC Men’s Golf Championship – First Round Pairings

8:30 – 9:10 a.m. = Boston College, Maryland, Notre Dame
9:20 – 10:00 a.m. = NC State, North Carolina, Duke
10:20 – 11:00 a.m. = Wake Forest, Clemson, Florida State
11:10 – 11:50 a.m. = Virginia Tech, Virginia, Georgia Tech

Duke enters as the defending champion and will try to repeat against a field that features four teams ranked in the top 20 nationally: No. 5 Georgia Tech, No. 8 Virginia, No. 12 Virginia Tech, and No. 19 Florida State. Clemson is No. 33, followed by No. 37 Wake Forest, No. 86 Duke, No. 92 North Carolina, No. 102 NC State, No. 104 Notre Dame, No. 139 Maryland and No. 212 Boston College.

Georgia Tech’s Ollie Schniederjans enters as the highest ranked golfer in the league at No. 3 in the country according to Golfstat. Following Schniederjans, five more ACC golfers rank in the top 50: No. 11 Scott Vincent (Virginia Tech), No. 15 Jack Maguire (Florida State), No. 22 Denny McCarthy (Virginia), No. 23 Seth Reeves (Georgia Tech) and No. 37 Trevor Cone (Virginia Tech).

2014 marks the 13th-straight year and 29th time overall that the league championship will be held at the Old North State Country Club. Wake Forest leads all schools with 18 league titles and 22 individual champions. Georgia Tech, which has won 12 outright ACC Championships and shared two more, has produced nine individual medalists, including Anders Albertson, last year’s winner. North Carolina is third with 11 titles (10 outright), followed by Clemson with nine (eight outright).

Saturday and Sunday action will be streamed live by the ACC Digital Network starting at 2 p.m. each day. There is no charge for admission.

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Duke’s McCrory heads All-ACC Academic Swimming & Diving Team

Duke senior Nick McCrory has been named the 2014 Atlantic Coast Conference Men’s Swimming & Diving Scholar-Athlete of the Year and headlines the 2014 All-ACC Academic Men’s Swimming & Diving Team, as announced today by Commissioner John Swofford.

A religion major from Chapel Hill

Nick McCrory.

Nick McCrory.

, McCrory won his fourth individual national championship in the platform dive discipline at the 2014 NCAA Championships, becoming the first to accomplish the feat in that event. In addition, McCrory earned All-America status on the one-meter board. McCrory completes his career as an 11-time All-American and a record 10 gold medals in ACC Championship competition.

Each of the ACC’s 11 schools that sponsor men’s swimming and diving are represented on the All-Academic Team, led by Virginia Tech with nine student-athletes. Virginia and Notre Dame have six apiece, while North Carolina has five, NC State has four and Georgia Tech has three. Duke and Florida State each had two, followed by Pitt, Miami and Boston College with one honoree.

Virginia Tech’s Ryan Hawkins and Nick Tremols, along with Florida State’s Tom Neubacher, NC State’s Jonathan Boffa and Virginia’s Taylor Grey, were named to the league’s academic team for the fourth time in their careers.

The ACC Scholar-Athlete of the Year awards were established in September 2007 to be awarded annually to the top junior or senior student-athlete in their respective sports. Candidates for the awards must have maintained a 3.0 grade point average for their career as well as a 3.0 for each of the last two semesters.

To be eligible for consideration for the All-ACC Academic Team, a student-athlete must have earned a 3.00 grade point average for the previous semester and maintained a 3.00 cumulative average during his academic career.

Sean Murphy
Sr.
Finance & Info Systems
Boston College

Nick McCrory #
Sr.
Religion
Duke

Hunter Knight
Sr.
Psychology
Duke

Tom Neubacher %
Sr.
Sport Management
Florida State

Jason McCormick
Fr.
Business
Florida State

Andrew Kosic #
Jr.
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
Georgia Tech

Nico van Duijn #
Jr.
Electrical Engineering
Georgia Tech

Mats Westergren
So.
Business Administration
Georgia Tech

Zach Nees
Sr.
Computer Science
Miami

Jack Nyquist
Fr.
Undecided
North Carolina

Patrick Myers #
Jr.
Business
North Carolina

Brad Dillon @
Sr.
Economics
North Carolina

Sam Lewis
So.
Mathematics
North Carolina

Dominick Glavich @
Jr.
Child Development & Family Studies
North Carolina

Jonathan Boffa %
Sr.
Graphic Design
NC State

Andreas Schiellerup
Fr.
Biological Sciences
NC State

Derek Hren
Fr.
Nutrition Sciences
NC State

Adam Linker
Fr.
Engineering
NC State

Joe Coumos
Fr.
Undeclared
Notre Dame

Colin Babcock
Sr.
Information Technology Management
Notre Dame

Zach Stephens
Jr.
Marketing
Notre Dame

Matthew Buerger
So.
Science-Business
Notre Dame

Kevin Hughes
Jr.
Accountancy
Notre Dame

Cameron Miller
Jr.
Science-Business
Notre Dame

Jon Lierley
Jr.
Finance
Pitt

Nathan Hart @
Sr.
Electrical Engineering
Virginia

Luke Papendick @
So.
Undeclared
Virginia

Yannick Kaeser
So.
Undeclared
Virginia

Jack Murfee @
Sr.
English
Virginia

David Ingraham
Jr.
Commerce
Virginia

Taylor Grey %
Sr.
Environmental Science
Virginia

Ryan Hawkins %
Sr.
Architecture
Virginia Tech

TJ Shinholser
Fr.
Business
Virginia Tech

Morgan Latimer @
Jr.
History
Virginia Tech

Harrison Cefalo
Jr.
Electrical Engineering
Virginia Tech

Brandon Fiala
Fr.
Finance
Virginia Tech

Robert Owen
Fr.
University Studies
Virginia Tech

Kyle Butts #
Jr.
Finance
Virginia Tech

Nick Tremols %
Sr.
Communications
Virginia Tech

CJ Fiala
Jr.
Communications
Virginia Tech

@ denotes two-time honoree

# denotes three-time honoree

% denotes four-time honoree

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UNC women go cold, fail to make it to Final Four

Allisha Gray.

Allisha Gray.

North Carolina, playing Stanford in Stanford, got out to a 13-point lead in the first half behind hot shooting but went cold in the second half to fall 74-65 in an Elite 8 game.

The Tar Heels, who end 27-10, went six minutes without a point during one stretch of the second half when Stanford came from six down at the half to take the lead. Then, over the last two minutes of the game, Stanford wrapped it up with an 8-0 run.

Carolina got down by eight in the second half but managed to go ahead 63-62 on a three from the top of the key by Jessica Washington with just under four minutes to play. But the Tar Heels would score just once more.

The Tar Heels made 7 of 13 first-half 3s but went just 2 of 9 in the second half.

UNC’s Allisha Gray scored 19 points while Diamond DeShields was held to 13 points on 5 for 15 from the floor including just one of six from beyond the arc.

Stanford, 33-3, goes to the Final Four to face unbeaten Connecticut. Two ACC teams – Notre Dame and Maryland – face off in the other semi-final.

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Tar Heel women make it to the Elite 8

tarheellogoNo. 12 upset No. 8 South Carolina 65-58 in the NCAA Sweet 16 on Sunday evening at Maples Pavilion.

North Carolina scored the first five points of the contest and looked to take control of the physical game. The Tar Heels made their move midway through the first half, going on a 9-2 run to build a 10-point lead at 20-10. The Gamecocks scored the next five points, making the score 20-15 with 6:42 on the clock, but did not find the basket for the next four minutes.

Latifah Coleman gave the Tar Heels their largest lead of the half at 27-15 with three minutes remaining, draining a 3 from straight away as the shot clock was expiring.

The Tar Heels led 29-21 at the half.

South Carolina scored on three straight possessions to draw the Gamecocks to within three at 35-32 with 14:45 to play. It was the closest since the Gamecocks had been since the 12-minute mark in the first half.

Diamond DeShields, who led the Heels with 19 points, asserted herself on the offensive end to put the Tar Heels back ahead 39-32. SC’s Tiffany Mitchell sank back-to-back 3s to help South Carolina draw to 43-42.

The Tar Heels seized the momentum back with back-to-back 3-pointers from Jessica Washington and DeShields putting the Tar Heels up 49-44 with 7:08 remaining.

The Gamecocks pulled to within two at 53-51 with five minutes left, but the Tar Heels had the answer, scoring six unanswered points to stretch the lead out to 59-51 with 2:40 on the clock ultimately settling for a seven-point victory.

The Tar Heels, 27-9, will play in Tuesday night’s regional final against Stanford (32-3), an 82-57 winner on its home court against Penn State in Sunday’s first game.

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DeShields leads Tar Heels into the Sweet Sixteen

Diamond DeShields.

Diamond DeShields.

Diamond DeShields almost singlehandedly put North Carolina into the Sweet 16 of NCAA Women’s Tournament by scoring 24 points and hauling in a season-high 12 rebounds to lead the Tar Heels over Michigan State 62-53 in Chapel Hill.

It was the first double-double for the freshman guard.

The Tar Heels, now 26-9, is the only Triangle team left in the tournament and will play in Sunday’s Stanford Regional semifinal.

In the first round, North Carolina had to rally from 18 down in the second half to beat UT Martin 60-58.

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Carolina certainly messed up late but a game shouldn’t end on a timing issue

clockThere were two or three plays late that hurt Carolina, that’s for sure. But a game shouldn’t end on a clock snafu.

The play that started Iowa State’s late run was Marcus Paige’s hurried three-point shot with about four minutes left. Carolina should have taken time off the clock and should have gotten a better look.

Paige took blame for the loss for a turnover he made in the last minute of the game but there is no guarantee Carolina would have scored on that play. But there was a guarantee that Carolina could have taken time off the clock with four minutes left and gotten a better shot. That was a bigger error.

UNC was up by eight and a bucket of any sort, three or not, could have been a big blow to Iowa State. Instead Iowa State quickly got the ball up the court and hit a three. What could have been an 11 or 10 point lead was instead five.

On Carolina’s very next possession the Heels turned it over on a foul. I’m not necessarily saying that McAdoo didn’t foul on the offensive end without the ball, but that’s a strange call for an official to make anyway, much less that late in a game.

The perfect storm continued on the next possession. After a Nate Britt miss, Kennedy Meeks had a chance for a relatively easy rebound stick back and he rushed it without fully controlling the ball and the tip missed.

North Carolina had every chance to win the game – well, make that almost every chance. After the final bucket, UNC players should have called a timeout. Of course the officials should have known Coach Williams was calling a timeout.

Yes, the clock should have started when Carolina inbounded the ball but once that ship has sailed it seems unfair to simply call the game over. If officials can look at the video to check the clock, it seems they could also look at the coach calling timeout.

A game should not end like that. A season should not end like that.

If you have the game on tape, go back to the 15.7 second mark after McAdoo tied the game at 83-all. The clock failed to start for about one or two seconds after an Iowa State player touched the inbounds pass. If you are going to call a game over when there is time left on the clock because there shouldn’t have been time left on the clock, it seems you would be a stickler with 15.7 seconds left also.

In fact, there were times throughout the game where the clock didn’t start accurately yet it’s only a problem at the end.

Could you imagine an NFL playoff game ending because the officials said the clock should have started and didn’t so one team doesn’t get to attempt a field goal even though there is time left?

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Tough season for UNC ends on tough shot, no last-second chance

uncbasketballclipartNorth Carolina fought adversity before the season, during the season and in the last game of season.

With a key player sidelined by injury and players in foul trouble, the Tar Heels came from behind to take an eight-point lead late, only to see Iowa State hit seven of its last eight shots to eliminate UNC from the NCAA Tournament 85-83. (3/23)

The last shot, by Iowa State’s DeAndre Kane, came with 1.6 seconds left to win it.

UNC’s James Michael McAdoo had hit two free throws with 15.7 seconds left to tie the score before Kane hit a driving, high-off-the-backboard shot that won it.

What made the loss even more devastating for Carolina was a clock snafu after the Kane shot and the fact that officials didn’t see UNC coach Roy Williams calling for a timeout. After several minutes of viewing the video, officials said that the game clock should have started and didn’t and proclaimed the game over.

UNC senior Leslie McDonald said that “it hit us hard” that the Heels didn’t get a chance to score after Iowa State’s late bucket but neither he nor Williams blamed the officials. “Kane just hit an unbelievable shot,” McDonald said.

McAdoo, who now must endure the speculation that he might go pro, agreed. “We played it really well. He just hit a tough shot,” McAdoo said.

Kane dominated much of the game, scoring a game-high 24 points. But it took a pair of threes by ISU’s Naz Long late to put Kane in the situation to win it.

“They made plays down the stretch that they needed to make,” Williams said.

North Carolina’s Bryce Johnson played only two minutes before twisting his ankle and having to sit out the rest of the game.

For more on the game, please click here.